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Best Can You Cut Corrugated Iron With A Circular Saw Resources and Information Online for Metal Cutting Circular Saws




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In woodworking the term circular saw is most commonly used to refer to a hand-held, electric circular saw designed for cutting wood, but may be used for cutting other materials with different blades. Circular saws can be either left or right-handed, depending on the side of the blade where the motor sits. A left-handed saw is typically easier to use if held in the right hand, and contrariwise for the right-handed saw, because the user does not need to lean across the saw to see the cutting line. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia� is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

The circular saw was invented around the end of the 18th century as a rip-saw to convert logs into lumber in sawmills and various claims have been made as to who invented the circular saw. Before the design was invented logs were sawn by hand using a pit saw or using powered saws in a sawmill using an up-and-down saw with a reciprocating motion. The rotary nature of the circular saw requires more power to operate but cuts faster because the teeth are in constant motion. The sound of the circular saw is different from the sound of an up-and-down saw and earned it the nickname buzz-saw.

&Multi-purpose Tool: The Cut-Off Wheels Set is suitable for all kinds of metal, wood, drywall, plastic, stone, ceramic, glass, hard alloy, the treasure jade stone processing and more / Ideal for cutting, grooving and trimming Cutting metal is a more difficult task than cutting wood, and it's accomplished more by abrasion than by removing a relatively large amount of wood. You'll find the RPMs that those 7-1/4-inch blades spin create a lot of sparks (read: flying, flaming hot metal shards) and will wear the blade quickly (please note: for safety, always confirm the blade RPM rating is within the saw's RPM rating.) The metal cutting saw's design is specific to keep those shards collected or at least deflect them better than your standard circular saw will. Finally, but more generally, a traditional wood circular saw's open housing might not protect against metal shard buildup. Metal-cutting saws typically have a closed housing for that purpose.

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Skill Saw Metal Blades

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Cutting metal with a circular saw - Don't Settle For 2nd Best.

From the design of a closed motor housing, nature of the material being expelled, shard collection/deflection, and limitations of the blade speed and size, it's just not a good idea to use a wood cutting saw for metal cutting purposes. Stick with circular saws designed for each specific task, and don't be afraid to go for a corded model if a cordless model is too tough on your budget. What you really don't want is to burn up your circular saw and be without an option to cut either material. Like so many others, it's an expensive lesson to learn. From the design of a closed motor housing, nature of the material being expelled, shard collection/deflection, and limitations of the blade speed and size, it's just not a good idea to use a wood cutting saw for metal cutting purposes. Stick with circular saws designed for each specific task, and don't be afraid to go for a corded model if a cordless model is too tough on your budget. What you really don't want is to burn up your circular saw and be without an option to cut either material. Like so many others, it's an expensive lesson to learn.

Yes. I have known several people who have done it. They were cutting thin sheet metal (as you would find in a steel building) and they didn't cut much. I believe I would use a metal cutting disk similar to that used in a cut-off saw or a fine toothed blade. Be certain to check the maximum RPM on the blade and get one appropriate for the RPM of the saw. running the metal cutting blade faster than it's listed speed could cause it to shatter. I would not use a blade intended for cutting wood. I've done a lot of metal work and strongly recommend an angle grinder with a cutting disk. It is fast, safe and will cut fairly straight without too much trouble. I use air shears for sheet metal usually but then you would need a compressor et al. I still have my first angle grinder (dewalt) and continue to use it. This would probably be my least favorite choice when it comes to a metal cutting saw. It is basically just a hacksaw on steroids for want of a better description. Don't get me wrong these are high quality saws, but when used on metal they are a pretty rough weapon of choice.

Jigsaws are increasingly being used for cutting harder materials, metal in particular. Obviously, though, cutting metal requires not only the correct blade, but a jigsaw with the power needed to perform the cut accurately and safely. Most home improvement stores only carry circular saw blades for cutting wood, so you may have to search online or go to a specialty tool store. Don't choose your saw blade solely on price, or you might not be happy with the results. As always when purchasing a blade for your circular saw, make sure it has the right diameter and arbor size to match your saw. In my post I was not suggesting a regular circular saw. I am not sure what the difference is between the link and a regular circular saw. Obviously a lot more shrouding around the blade. I have cut a lot of aluminum soffit using a regular circular saw with the blade in backwards but I would not try it on steel.

^ John O. Curtis, "The Introduction of the Circular Saw in the Early 19th Century". Bulletin of the Association for Preservation Technology Vol. 5, No. 2 (1973), pp. 162 189; also Inventors website and Wood News

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